African American History Month

Hallowed Grounds: Sites of African American Memories

The history of African Americans unfolds across the canvas of America, beginning before the arrival of the Mayflower and continuing to the present. From port cities where Africans disembarked from slave ships to the battle fields where their descendants fought for freedom, from the colleges and universities where they pursued education to places where they created communities during centuries of migration, the imprint of Americans of African descent is deeply embedded in the narrative of the American past. These sites prompt us to remember and over time became hallowed grounds.

One cannot tell the story of America without preserving and reflecting on the places where African Americans have made history. The Kingsley Plantation, DuSable’s home site, the numerous stops along the Underground Railroad, Seneca Village, Mother Bethel A.M.E. Church and Frederick Douglass’ home — to name just a few — are sites that keep alive the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in our consciousness. They retain and refresh the memories of our forbears’ struggles for freedom and justice, and their belief in God's grace and mercy. Similarly, the hallowed grounds of Mary McLeod Bethune's home in Washington, D.C., 125th Street in Harlem, Beale Street in Memphis, and Sweet Auburn Avenue in Atlanta tell the story of our struggle for equal citizenship during the American century. The National Park Service (NPS) takes responsibility for preserving and teaching about the places that have been central in the making of African American memory. Virtually every aspect of our experience has become part and parcel of the NPS mission, including the home of our founder Carter G. Woodson. ASALH joins the National Park Service in celebrating a century of preserving the hallowed grounds of African Americans and all Americans.

- Association for the Study of African American Life and History Theme 2016

Events

Thursday, February 4, 2016

Leslie Walker Photo

"Dark Histories, Triumphant Memories, and Respect for the Dead: Challenges to preserving Our Historic Structures and Cultural Landscapes."
Dr. Elgin Klugh, Associate Professor, Coppin State University

2:00pm
Health and Human Services Building, Room 312

This talk will use the examples of a historic African American beach in Florida, historically rehabilitated Rosenwald Schoolhouses, and a forgotten East Baltimore cemetery to interrogate socioeconomic challenges for the preservation of African American history.

Elgin Klugh is an Associate Professor in Applied Social and Political Sciences at Coppin State University in Baltimore, MD. Dr. Klugh graduated from Morehouse College and subsequently earned Master's and Doctoral degrees in Applied Anthropology from the University of South Florida. He is an Urban Anthropologist with primary areas of interest including Heritage, Cultural Landscapes, Oral History, and Community Revitalization.

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Leslie Walker Photo

"Hallowed Grounds: Sites of African American Memories"
Leslie Walker, M.A.

12:30pm
Health and Human Services Building, Room 419

Mr. Walker will be using the BHM theme for his title: "Hallowed Grounds: Sites of African American Memories." He will be speaking about the importance of cultural knowledge for the preservation of both tangible and intangible aspects of African American history. His talk will highlight Washington, DC metropolitan area African American historic sites and monuments that are managed by the National Park Service.

Leslie Walker is a cultural anthropologist whose research includes cultural resource management, the intersection of cultural heritage and environmental justice, and community resiliency. His research investigates the concerns of African-American and Latino communities largely in the Eastern United States and the Caribbean. Leslie attended St. Mary's College of Maryland earning a degree in Anthropology and Spanish. He received his Masters of Art in Applied Anthropology from the University of South Florida. Leslie concurrently is an instructor of anthropology at Prince George's Community College and a cultural anthropology fellow for the National Park Service's National Capital Region.

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Dr. Hattie Washington Book Signing

2:00pm - 4:00pm
Parlett L. Moore Library, Cab Calloway Room

Please join Dr. Hattie N. Washington for the black history relevance discussion and signing of her new book, "Driven to Succeed an Inspirational Memoir of Lessons Learned Through Faith, Family and Favor". This event also features the video "Take Me Back". Event Flyer

Thursday, February 11, 2016

Video presentation: "Banished" African American Land Owners

2:00pm - 4:00pm
Health and Human Services Building, Room 312

Banished vividly recounts the forgotten history of racial cleansing in America when thousands of African Americas were driven from their homes and communities by violent racist mobs in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In fear for their lives, black people left these towns and never returned to reclaim their property. The film places these events in the context of present day race relations, by following three concrete cases of towns that remain all-white to this day (Forsyth County, Georgia; Pierce City, Missouri; Harrison, Arkansas). Banished raises the larger questions -- will the United States ever make meaningful reparations for the human rights abuses suffered, then and now, against its African American citizens? Can reconciliation between the races be possible without them?

Banished follows a twisting trail through yellowed newspaper archives registries of deeds, photos from treasured family albums and dimly recalled stories of elders who lived through those traumatic events. The film features black families determined to go to any length to reconstruct their families past and gain some justice for their ancestors and themselves. It also interviews dedicated, local, newspaper reporters who braved community opposition to research the banishments in-depth and force their readers to confront their towns past and present.

Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Video presentation: "Banished" African American Land Owners

5:30pm – 7:30pm
Health and Human Services Building, Room 201

Banished vividly recounts the forgotten history of racial cleansing in America when thousands of African Americas were driven from their homes and communities by violent racist mobs in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In fear for their lives, black people left these towns and never returned to reclaim their property. The film places these events in the context of present day race relations, by following three concrete cases of towns that remain all-white to this day (Forsyth County, Georgia; Pierce City, Missouri; Harrison, Arkansas). Banished raises the larger questions -- will the United States ever make meaningful reparations for the human rights abuses suffered, then and now, against its African American citizens? Can reconciliation between the races be possible without them?

Banished follows a twisting trail through yellowed newspaper archives registries of deeds, photos from treasured family albums and dimly recalled stories of elders who lived through those traumatic events. The film features black families determined to go to any length to reconstruct their families past and gain some justice for their ancestors and themselves. It also interviews dedicated, local, newspaper reporters who braved community opposition to research the banishments in-depth and force their readers to confront their towns past and present.

Thursday, February 18, 2016

Photo

Coppin State University presents "Oh Freedom!"

7:00pm
James Weldon Auditorium

On Thursday, February 18, 2016 at 7PM we will commemorate the historic sites of the African American journey from slave ships, to the battle fields of the Civil War, to the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. We will celebrate through dance, song, and spoken word. Join us for this FREE event. Event Flyer


Thursday, February 25, 2016

Market Place

10:00am - 5:00pm
Tawes University Center

Monday, February 29, 2016

Celebration of our Ancestors

Time & Location: TBA

A Candle light walk and celebration


Freedom Bus Tour to Washington DC

Departure from Talon Center parking lot. 9am. Return time: 5pm

Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Carter G. Woodson Lecture

12:30pm - 1:50pm

Atrium of the Talon Center

The Department of Humanities and the African American History Month Committee cordially invites you to attend the Annual Carter G. Woodson History Month Lecture focusing on the 2016 Theme – Hallowed Grounds: Sites of African American Memories.

This year's Woodson Lecture will feature a panel of three distinguished academicians who will enthusiastically engage the audience on how their respective institutions "Preserves and Makes Available African American History".

Program Participants:

Ms. Vivian Fisher, Manager
African American Department
State Library Resource Center
Enoch Pratt Free Library

Dr. Kathryn Medina, Professor
Author and Historian
Department of Humanities
Coppin State University

Dr. Lopez D. Matthews
Manager, Digital Productions Center
The Moorland-Spingarn Research Center
Howard University

Monday, March 21, 2016

Women in the Modern Civil Rights Movement

12:30pm - 1:50pm

Location: TBA

This program features presentations by students about the critical roles in the Modern Civil Rights Movement played by four women. The panel presentations grow out of research by students who are currently enrolled in African American History II.

Student Participants Civil Rights Participants
Ms. Wynisha Witt
Sophomore
Nursing Major
Juanita Jackson Mitchell
Elishabha Eaton
Junior
Elementary Education
Fannie Lou Hamer
Shonda Jackson
Senior
Criminal Justice
Septima Poinsette Clark
Ione Hazelwood
JuniorElementary Education
Gloria Richardson